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Back in Balance

Two of the fundamental principles of Chinese Medicine are balance and harmony. In this system of medicine, the body is conceived of as a complex network, with each part reflecting the whole and connected to every other part via the neurovascular and fascial vessel systems that I have discussed previously. Beyond this, each person is also seen as a part of a wider network formed by the outside environment, a part of nature, receiving nourishment and support from the various external sources like food, water and the warmth of the sun, but also from personal relationships and social group interactions.

All of these interconnected networks exist in a state of dynamic balance, fluctuating according to our actions, emotions, activities and events that befall us. When disease or dysfunction occurs, it could be seen as a disruption affecting this state of balance leading to an imbalance. However, another way to look at it is that the state of dynamic balance has simply shifted to a new state that represents the body’s best attempt to cope with the various circumstances. Let’s take the case, for example, of an office worker, who has a particularly stressful job, with constant deadlines and performance markers to attain. This person might also work at a computer for large portions of the day, breathing shallowly and hunched over. They may also come back to a home life filled with family responsibilities, looking after the needs of young children etc. Over the past few months it may not come as a huge surprise that this person has developed very tight, painful shoulders and a stiff neck. It may be tempting for them to see their body as ‘letting them down’, and ‘going wrong’, but in fact, with all the stress that is going on and the poor posture the body is simply finding the best way to maintain balance and function given the demands placed upon it. Unfortunately the longer the body stays in this less desirable state of balance the more it becomes ingrained. Also, a vicious cycle can occur whereby an already poor posture is worsened in attempts to relieve the tension, and the chronic pain can lead to irritability which tends to make personal and work relationships suffer leading to yet more stress and tension…

So how can acupuncture help with this? Firstly, by placing needles in certain parts of the body, we can help to move the body into a different, more desirable state of balance, relieving the tension that has accumulated in one region by stimulating a complementary region. When this region has been correctly chosen, patients will usually know pretty quickly, as they will feel the pain and tension ease. As the tension eases, that person then has a chance to reverse the vicious cycle. Using insights into their condition that can be offered from a Chinese Medicine perspective, they can make changes to posture and perhaps engage in some simple breathing exercises to help reduce stress. These lifestyle changes combined with the acupuncture can quickly help to bring long-lasting relief from the condition and minimise the chance of recurrence.

Rob Veater Acupuncture: providing effective acupuncture services for Colne Engaine, Earls Colne, Pebmarsh, Halstead, Sudbury, Colchester and surrounding areas